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Public Art Tour | Cambridge Arts Council
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"Untitled"

Reimann, William

Riverside, Sculpture

Memorial Drive at Flagg Street

Cambridge, MA 02139

Location Description: Corporal Burns Park, at entrances and along walkway on Flagg St.

Date: 1998

Materials: Granite

Dimensions: Sixteen images, 9' x 9'; four images, 2' x 2'

To create these intricate designs, based on plants and animals of the nearby riverbank, William Reimann used a modern tombstone cutting technique in which a cut rubber stencil is affixed to the granite before sandblasting removes the exposed stone. Reimann drew and cut each of his detailed designs on the stencils by hand. The images are located on the opposed sides of eight bollards at park entrances and on four granite panels that are placed in the ground of the walkway along Flagg Street. Cut approximately 1/4" into the surface of the granite columns, the designs are perfect for handrubbing reproductions.

A sculptor, draftsman, and designer, Reimann began his career at Yale University, where he received his M.F.A. in 1961. He experimented with plexiglas and steel earlier in his career, but his current medium of choice is sandblasted stone. Animals and the natural world are frequent subjects, as are designs and symbols from the world's ancient cultures. His works are in the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum and the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, and the National Gallery in Washington, DC, as well as in numerous private, corporate, and public settings. A longtime Cambridge resident, Reimann teaches in the Visual and Environmental Studies Department at Harvard University.